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  • Igor Monteiro 13:47 em 31 31UTC July 31UTC 2018 Link Permanente | Resposta  

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTbqCvSJGgE

    Anúncios
     
  • Igor Monteiro 13:44 em 31 31UTC July 31UTC 2018 Link Permanente | Resposta  

    CWPKI0033E:javax.crypto.BadPaddingException: Given final block not properly padded. 

    Howd’y !

    After migrated WAS 7 to WAS 8.5.5, by using WASPreUpgrade, WASPostUpgrade, I did synchronize the node along with Dmgr and had the following error during nodeagent start:

    [7/29/18 7:39:26:536 GMT] 00000001 WSKeyStore E CWPKI0033E: The keystore located at “/WebSphere855/AppServer/profiles/xx/config/cells/xxxx/nodes/Commerce_node/key.p12” failed to load due to the folowing error: failed to decrypt safe contents entry: javax.crypto.BadPaddingException: Given final block not properly padded.

    So, the resolution was:

    1 – Stopped new WAS

    2 – Cleaned up the Caches on profiles: temp, wstemp, config/temp.

    3 – Copy all key.p12 from old WebSphere to the same path to the newest WAS Folder. I ran “find /Old/Was/AppServer -name key.p12

    and copied them to the new WAS folder.

    Before doing that, do a Copy Backup of key.p12 files.

    4 – started Dmgr

    5 – synchronized Nodes

    6 – Started nodeagent

    7 – started AppServer.

     
  • Igor Monteiro 15:24 em 21 21UTC July 21UTC 2018 Link Permanente | Resposta  

    Reference: Migrate WebSphere App.Server 7 to the latest 

    Use the latest Installation Manager, 1.8.9, for installing or updating WebSpheree 8.5 or 9.0. After downloading and installing WebSphere 8.5.5 or 9.0, you should update WebSphere to the latest available FixPack level ; FixPack 8.5.5.13 for WebSphere 8.5.5, or FixPack 9.0.0.7 to for WebSphere 9.0, so that you have the latest fixes for WebSphere defects, including migration related fixes.

    Installation Manager 1.8.9

    http://www-01.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?uid=swg24044637

    Recommended updates for WebSphere Application Server

    http://www-01.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?rs=180&uid=swg27004980

    Afterward, you should execute the WASPreUpgrade.bat/sh script from the /bin/, in the WebSphere 8.5.5.x or 9.0.0.x installation, to generate the backup of the WebSphere v7.0 profile. The next step would be to execute the WASPostUpgrade.bat/sh script from /bin/, in the WebSphere 8.5.5.x or 9.0.0.x installation, to transform the .xml file format from the WebSphere 7.0 environment into the format for the later version, then deploy the applications from the 7.0 environment, in the new environment.

    WASPostUpgrade command:

    https://www.ibm.com/support/knowledgecenter/en/SSEQTP_8.5.5com.ibm.websphere.base.doc/ae/rmig_WASPostUpgrade.html

    Please review the following informative developerWorks blog:

    WebSphere Application Server Migration Guide

    https://www.ibm.com/developerworks/community/blogs/aimsupport/entrywebsphere_application_server_migration_guide?lang=en

    As well as the following comprehensive reference:

    WebSphere Migration Knowledge Collection: Planning and Resources

    http://www-01.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?rs=180&uid=swg27004980

    Click on the WebSphere version to which you are migrating.

     
  • Igor Monteiro 15:07 em 21 21UTC July 21UTC 2018 Link Permanente | Resposta  

    Strengthen Cipher encryption in WebSphere 

    WAS side steps:
    For the WAS servers, you can remove any 3DES ciphers from the SSL configurations being used by the servers:

    How to change strength/customize cipher suite groups in WebSphere Application Server

    1. Go to “Quality of protection (QoP) settings” panel by going …SSL certificate and key management > SSL configurations > (SSL config
    name) > Quality of protection (QoP) settings

    2. On the panel, select “Strong” in “Cipher suite settings” and press “Update selected ciphers” so that in “Cipher suites” section, you will
    see strong ciphers in “Selected ciphers” (Right hand side) ”

    3. Examine the list of “Selected ciphers” one by one to make sure none of them contain the following strings

    _3DES_

    If any do, select them and press “Remove” button to remove it from Selected ciphers.

    4. Once we have good ciphers in “Selected ciphers”, press “Apply” or “OK” and save the ciphers.

     
  • Igor Monteiro 15:50 em 13 13UTC July 13UTC 2018 Link Permanente | Resposta  

    Technical Coach, WebSphere App & Infra 

    Hi! As 13 yrs in WebSphere world, I’m doing something different: Doing Coach at weekends!
    It is not indeed a training class like you see everywhere. It is a Technical Coach specially for 1 person, based on what he/she needs to learn WAS, Commerce, Portal and IHS both Distributed and Mainframe.
    So, I called it as Technical Coach! Great, contact me if you are interested on! Thank you!!!
    Or, I also teach in normal classes:
    1) WAS V8.5 z/OS for Dummies
    experienced/advanced activities administering WebSphere Application Server V8.5 in a Windows, UNIX or Mainframe environment.
    2) WAS V8.5 DS/MF Ninja
    activities implementing WebSphere Application Server V8.5 in a Mainframe z/OS environment.
    3) WAS V9 DS/MF Ninja
    activities administering WebSphere Application Server V9 in a Windows, UNIX or Mainframe environment.
    Note: Regardless it’s quality of ads, (haha) , It’s much more a Hobby than a job by itself. So, will develop my coach skills and your technical skills. Enjoy this time!

    (Mais…)

     
  • Igor Monteiro 19:21 em 12 12UTC July 12UTC 2018 Link Permanente | Resposta  

    SecDevOps in Docker IBM Cloud: My Top 5 Security tips for Integrity 

    imageimage

    • A few of points that less of people concerns about – or even implement it – but that might eventually harm the Application or event the Business by itself. Today is about Security.

    • Below I am going to list the Top 5 Security Matters for a Stable and Secure Containerization in IBM Cloud repository. Look at that and enjoy:

    1 – Kernel Expoitation

    Different than a Virtual Machine, where Hypervisor does not share the same Kernel as it’s Host, the kernel is shared between all the containers inserted at same Host. It increases the pervasiveness exploitation.

    Recommendation: Keep Patch Management Up to Date.

    2 – Denial-of-Service Attacks

    Since all containers within same Host shares the same kernel’s resrouces, if one container monopolizes the resources’s access, including memory or even UIDs, the exposure of lack of resources to others container may unleash a DoS.

    Recommendation: Make sure containers are one-directional to access resources and create Keys to communicate between them.

    3 – Hacking Containers

    The premise is: A hacker must not access the Host through Container breakout.

    Recommendation: Do not use root in the Container, because he will be root on Host.

    4 – Images Integrity

    How do you know and make sure the images are not poisoned?

    Recommendation: Make sure the namespaces IBM Cloud are used all time on every commit as well.

    5 – Application Data Leak

    When a container accesses some database or service, usually uses a password and username for.

    Recommendation: Use an isolate container for Data and don’t leave it running, Use as well keys not explicit in Dockerfiles during it’s build.

     
  • Igor Monteiro 19:20 em 12 12UTC July 12UTC 2018 Link Permanente | Resposta  

    Kubernetes for Dummies: Your first Cluster IBM Cloud Private! #1 

    A step-by-step to start creating your First Cluster Kubernetes in IBM Cloud.

    Hope you enjoy! Stay tuned!

    For Windows machines:

    Install Chocolatey

    @”%SystemRoot%\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\powershell.exe” -NoProfile -InputFormat None -ExecutionPolicy Bypass -Command “iex ((New-Object System.Net.WebClient).DownloadString(‘https://chocolatey.org/install.ps1’))” && SET “PATH=%PATH%;%ALLUSERSPROFILE%\chocolatey\bin”

    Getting latest version of the Chocolatey package for download.
    Getting Chocolatey from https://chocolatey.org/api/v2/package/chocolatey/0.10.11.
    Extracting C:\Users\IGORMO~1\AppData\Local\Temp\chocolatey\chocInstall\chocolatey.zip to C:\Users\IGORMO~1\AppData\Local\Temp\chocolatey\chocInstall…
    Installing chocolatey on this machine
    Creating ChocolateyInstall as an environment variable (targeting ‘Machine’)
    Setting ChocolateyInstall to ‘C:\ProgramData\chocolatey’
    WARNING: It’s very likely you will need to close and reopen your shell
    before you can use choco.
    Restricting write permissions to Administrators
    We are setting up the Chocolatey package repository.
    The packages themselves go to ‘C:\ProgramData\chocolatey\lib’
    (i.e. C:\ProgramData\chocolatey\lib\yourPackageName).
    A shim file for the command line goes to ‘C:\ProgramData\chocolatey\bin’
    and points to an executable in ‘C:\ProgramData\chocolatey\lib\yourPackageName’.

    Creating Chocolatey folders if they do not already exist.

    WARNING: You can safely ignore errors related to missing log files when
    upgrading from a version of Chocolatey less than 0.9.9.
    ‘Batch file could not be found’ is also safe to ignore.
    ‘The system cannot find the file specified’ – also safe.
    chocolatey.nupkg file not installed in lib.
    Attempting to locate it from bootstrapper.
    PATH environment variable does not have C:\ProgramData\chocolatey\bin in it. Adding…
    WARNING: Not setting tab completion: Profile file does not exist at ‘C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira\Documents\WindowsPowerShell\Microsoft.PowerShell_profile.ps1’.
    Chocolatey (choco.exe) is now ready.
    You can call choco from anywhere, command line or powershell by typing choco.
    Run choco /? for a list of functions.
    You may need to shut down and restart powershell and/or consoles
    first prior to using choco.
    Ensuring chocolatey commands are on the path
    Ensuring chocolatey.nupkg is in the lib folder

    Install kubernetes-helm

    C:\WINDOWS\system32>choco install kubernetes-helm
    Chocolatey v0.10.11
    Installing the following packages:
    kubernetes-helm
    By installing you accept licenses for the packages.
    Progress: Downloading kubernetes-helm 2.9.1… 100%

    kubernetes-helm v2.9.1 [Approved]
    kubernetes-helm package files install completed. Performing other installation steps.
    The package kubernetes-helm wants to run ‘chocolateyInstall.ps1’.
    Note: If you don’t run this script, the installation will fail.
    Note: To confirm automatically next time, use ‘-y’ or consider:
    choco feature enable -n allowGlobalConfirmation
    Do you want to run the script?([Y]es/[N]o/[P]rint): Y

    Downloading kubernetes-helm 64 bit
    from ‘https://storage.googleapis.com/kubernetes-helm/helm-v2.9.1-windows-amd64.zip’
    Progress: 100% – Completed download of C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira\AppData\Local\Temp\chocolatey\kubernetes-helm\2.9.1\helm-v2.9.1-windows-amd64.zip (8.78 MB).
    Download of helm-v2.9.1-windows-amd64.zip (8.78 MB) completed.
    Hashes match.
    Extracting C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira\AppData\Local\Temp\chocolatey\kubernetes-helm\2.9.1\helm-v2.9.1-windows-amd64.zip to C:\ProgramData\chocolatey\lib\kubernetes-helm\tools…
    C:\ProgramData\chocolatey\lib\kubernetes-helm\tools
    Environment Vars (like PATH) have changed. Close/reopen your shell to
    see the changes (or in powershell/cmd.exe just type `refreshenv`).
    ShimGen has successfully created a shim for helm.exe
    The install of kubernetes-helm was successful.
    Software installed to ‘C:\ProgramData\chocolatey\lib\kubernetes-helm\tools’

    Chocolatey installed 1/1 packages.
    See the log for details (C:\ProgramData\chocolatey\logs\chocolatey.log).

    Add incubator (I will tell you in next post what is that. For security reasons, install!)

    helm repo add ibm-incubator https://registry.bluemix.net/helm/ibm-incubator
    Error: Couldn’t load repositories file (C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira\.helm\repository\repositories.yaml).
    You might need to run `helm init` (or `helm init –client-only` if tiller is already installed)

    C:\WINDOWS\system32>cd helm init
    The system cannot find the path specified.

    C:\WINDOWS\system32>helm init
    Creating C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira\.helm
    Creating C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira\.helm\repository
    Creating C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira\.helm\repository\cache
    Creating C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira\.helm\repository\local
    Creating C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira\.helm\plugins
    Creating C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira\.helm\starters
    Creating C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira\.helm\cache\archive
    Creating C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira\.helm\repository\repositories.yaml
    Adding stable repo with URL: https://kubernetes-charts.storage.googleapis.com
    Adding local repo with URL: http://127.0.0.1:8879/charts
    $HELM_HOME has been configured at C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira\.helm.
    Error: error installing: Post http://localhost:8080/apis/extensions/v1beta1/namespaces/kube-system/deployments: dial tcp 127.0.0.1:8080: connectex: No connection could be made because the target machine actively refused it.

    Start Helm

    C:\WINDOWS\system32>helm init –client-only
    $HELM_HOME has been configured at C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira\.helm.
    Not installing Tiller due to ‘client-only’ flag having been set
    Happy Helming!

    Add Docker container to the repository

    C:\WINDOWS\system32>helm repo add ibm-incubator https://registry.bluemix.net/helm/ibm-incubator
    “ibm-incubator” has been added to your repositories

    Create a service ID to IBM Cloud

    C:\WINDOWS\system32>bx iam service-id-create ibmigor
    Creating service ID ibmigor bound to current account as igor@br.ibm.com
    OK
    Service ID ibmigor is created successfully

    Name          ibmigor
    Description
    CRN           crn:v1:bluemix:public:iam-identity::a/596165d331edf2279*******9d50::serviceid:ServiceId-a0f3807b-225c-47e9*****3504aa53
    Bound To      crn:v1:bluemix:public:::a/596165****f22796ad7644a2889d50:::
    Version       1-a11b73ee87d878a2a3e26d49a3385b35
    Locked        false
    UUID          ServiceId-a0f38******7e9-8b20-27de3504aa53

    Create an API

    C:\WINDOWS\system32>bx iam service-api-key-create apikeyname ibmigor
    Creating API key apikeyname of service ibmigor as igor@br.ibm.com
    OK
    Service API key apikeyname is created

    Please preserve the API key! It cannot be retrieved after it’s created.

    Name          apikeyname
    Description
    Bound To      crn:v1:bluemix:public:iam-identity::a/596165d33***44a2889d50::serviceid:ServiceId-a0f3****7e9-8b20-27de3504aa53
    Created At    2018-07-11T23:04+0000
    API Key       KnMqBkyfTAZhBXx_GY8Ac6***Cwjh7ps
    Locked        false
    UUID          ApiKey-dcc6fc4f-******f505

    Create such Policy for that container

    C:\WINDOWS\system32>bx iam service-policy-create ibmigor –resource-type scaningress –service-name container-registry –roles Writer
    Creating policy under current account for service ID ibmigor as igor@br.ibm.com
    OK
    Service policy is successfully created

    Policy ID:   ef76ac2f-c6f9-40c0-b51c-1a0450a281ed
    Version:     1-48d5ad27242782ac38f451c2928f0f55
    Roles:       Writer
    Resources:
    Service Name       container-registry
    Service Instance
    Region
    Resource Type      scaningress
    Resource

    Let’s inspect that container?

    C:\WINDOWS\system32>helm inspect values ibm-incubator/ibmcloud-container-scanner > config.yaml

    Identify your AccountID

    C:\WINDOWS\system32>bx account list
    Retrieving all accounts of igor@br.ibm.com
    OK
    Account GUID                       Name                      State    Owner User ID
    596165****df22796ad7644a2889d50   IGOR MONTEIRO’s Account   ACTIVE   igor@br.ibm.com

    Is there any cluster available? Not yet!

    C:\WINDOWS\system32>bx cs clusters
    OK
    Name   ID   State   Created   Workers   Location   Version

    What are the zones?

    C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira>ibmcloud cs zones

    OK
    Zone
    sao01
    dal10
    dal12
    dal13

    Ok, I want to see even more. What are the types into zone?

    C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira>ibmcloud cs machine-types sao01
    OK
    Name         Cores   Memory   Network Speed   OS             Server Type   Storage   Secondary Storage   Trustable
    u2c.2×4      2       4GB      1000Mbps        UBUNTU_16_64   virtual       25GB      100GB               false
    b2c.4×16     4       16GB     1000Mbps        UBUNTU_16_64   virtual       25GB      100GB               false
    b2c.16×64    16      64GB     1000Mbps        UBUNTU_16_64   virtual       25GB      100GB               false
    b2c.32×128   32      128GB    1000Mbps        UBUNTU_16_64   virtual       25GB      100GB               false
    b2c.56×242   56      242GB    1000Mbps        UBUNTU_16_64   virtual       25GB      100GB               false

    You know, Let’s rock! Create your FIRST Cluster with Free Account:

    C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira>ibmcloud cs cluster-create –name igorcluster
    The ‘machine-type’ flag was not specified. So a free cluster will be created.
    Creating cluster…
    OK

    Creation status is: Requested. You have to wait Deployed.

    C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira>ibmcloud cs clusters
    OK
    Name          ID                                 State       Created          Workers   Location         Version
    igorcluster   26ce924a271e4fafb0c3f0cb0de71079   requested   14 seconds ago   1         us-south-hou02   1.9.8_1515

    What are the workers for my cluster?

    C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira>ibmcloud cs workers igorcluster
    OK
    ID                                                 Public IP   Private IP   Machine Type   State               Status   Zone    Version
    kube-hou02-pa26ce924a271e4fafb0c3f0cb0de71079-w1   –           –            free           provision_pending   –        hou02   1.9.8_1517

    What are the config for my cluster ? Ohhh, still haven’t finished it’s creation. Tongue

    C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira>ibmcloud cs cluster-config igorcluster
    FAILED

    The cluster is not fully deployed yet. Wait a few minutes, then try again.   (E0030)
    Incident ID: 7dab38c2-80f4-4f47-bce0-54c2818b3ed0

    What is the status? Normal, it’s fine then!

    C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira>ibmcloud cs clusters

    OK
    Name          ID                                 State    Created          Workers   Location   Version
    igorcluster   26ce924a271e4fafb0c3f0cb0de71079   normal   41 minutes ago   1         Dallas     1.9.8_1515

    Let’s get the variables and start playing?

    C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira>ibmcloud cs cluster-config igorcluster
    OK
    The configuration for igorcluster was downloaded successfully. Export environment variables to start using Kubernetes.

    SET KUBECONFIG=C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira\.bluemix\plugins\container-service\clusters\igorcluster\kube-config-hou02-igorcluster.yml

    Export that variable:

    C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira>SET KUBECONFIG=C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira\.bluemix\plugins\container-service\clusters\igorcluster\kube-config-hou02-igorcluster.yml

    Finally, start your Kubernetes Locally with Proxy Tunnel:

    C:\Users\IgorMonteiroVieira>kubectl proxy
    Starting to serve on 127.0.0.1:8001

    Enjoyed? Post here your tries!

     
  • Igor Monteiro 11:21 em 12 12UTC July 12UTC 2018 Link Permanente | Resposta  

    Top Docker Tools: 51 Useful Docker Tools for Every Stage of the Development Pipeline 

    Docker is sweeping across startups and enterprises alike, changing the way we build and ship applications. It’s the most prominent and widely known software container platform, and it’s particularly useful for eliminating common challenges when collaborating on code (like the “it works on my machine” phenomenon that most devs know all too well). With Docker, you can run and manage apps side-by-side – in isolated containers – resulting in better compute density. It’s something that many developers don’t think about, but you can even user Docker with asp.net.

    You probably don’t need to be sold on the many appealing Docker capabilities, but you might not be familiar with the wide range of third-party tools that integrate seamlessly with Docker, from logging tools to database tools, CI tools, and more. Docker, of course, has its own tools for managing containers, but in this post, we’re going to look at third-party tools that are essential to enabling a great container experience in your organization. We’ll walk through 50 of the user-friendly, functional Docker tools you can use to transform your software development at every stage, including:

    • Orchestration Tools
    • Kubernetes as a Service
    • Registries
    • Web Server
    • Database Tools
    • Storage
    • Networking
    • Operating Systems
    • Infrastructure & Management
    • Configuration Management
    • CI Tools
    • Container Lifecycle Management
    • Monitoring Tools
    • PaaS

    Read on to find out how you can leverage these tools to create a better container experience. And when you’re ready to discover more tools to manage and improve your code, download our Ultimate Dev Toolbox – it’s free!

    Orchestration Tools

    RancherOS

    @Rancher_Labs

    RancherOS

    Source: doublev.io

    A minimalist OS, RancherOS is closely integrated with Docker Compose which it uses to define system services.

    Key Features:

    • Simplifies running containers at any scale
    • Eliminates the need for unnecessary libraries and services
    • Decreases boot time and complexities

    Cost: Free

    Kubernetes

    @kubernetesio

     Kubernetes

    Source: dt-cdn.net

    Kubernetes is, without a doubt, the leading container orchestrator available today. It groups containers into clusters and decouples your apps from the underlying infrastructure that powers them.

    Key Features:

    • Scale your infrastructure effortlessly, without growing your Ops team
    • Open source tool allows you to extend for your custom needs
    • Battle-tested by Google, where it was developed, and able to scale to more than 5,000 nodes

    Cost: Free

    Mesosphere DC/OS

    @mesosphere

    Mesosphere DC/OS

    Source: techtimes.com

    Mesosphere makes building and deploying web-scale applications fast and reliable. Used at Twitter, AirBnB, and a host of other large-scale organizations, Mesosphere is one of the early container orchestrators to make it big.

    Key Features:

    • Based on the open source Apache Mesos cluster manager
    • Treats the entire datacenter as a single super computer
    • New data services available: Alluxio, Elastic Shark, Redis Labs, Datastax Enterprise and Couchbase Server

    Cost: Contact for cost information (pricing based on number of nodes/environment)

    TOSCA/Cloudify

    @CloudifySource

    TOSCA/Cloudify

    Source: concrete5.org

    Cloudify orchestrates not just containers, but VMs and OpenStack as well. It brings Dev and Ops on a single platform to work collaboratively.

    Key Features:

    • Built to seamlessly work with containers, VMs, and OpenStack
    • Provides a built-in plugin for AWS, Apache Cloudstack, and SoftLayer
    • Orchestration managed right from the dashboard

    Cost: Free evaluation; contact for cost details

    Nomad

    Nomad

    Source: nmedit.sourceforge.net

    From running a single container to running thousands of them, this tools allows you to run up to 1 million containers on 5,000 hosts in a meager 5 minutes.

    Key Features:

    • Supports Linux, Windows, BSD, and OSX to run any workload
    • Provides multi-datacenter support to enable you to run applications from any cloud
    • Increases density and reduces costs by efficiently packing applications on the server

    Cost: Free

    ContainerShip

    @containershipio

    Containership

    Source: Containership.io

    Easily automate your infrastructure and applications, and access it from any location through any cloud provider, with this tool.

    Key Features:

    • Smooth builds from Git repo to Dockerfile with the click of a button
    • Choose from 11 cloud providers when hosting your app

    Cost:

    • Developer: $10/month (up to 3 applications)
    • Startup: $250/month (up to 10 apps)
    • Growth: $1,000/month (up to 25 apps)
    • Business: $5,000/month (unlimited apps)

    Kubernetes as a Service

    CoreOS Tectonic

    @coreos

    CoreOS Tectonic

    Source: coreos.com

    Kubernetes can be hard to setup and maintain on your own. Tectonic provides Kubernetes as a service so you can focus on building and shipping your app, not maintaining Kubernetes.

    Key Features:

    • Provides updates keeping with the Kubernetes release cycle
    • Includes a built-in installer to get you up and running
    • Backed by the capable CoreOS team which makes up a large contributor base of the Kubernetes open source project

    Cost: Free for use up to 10 nodes; contact for cost for 10+ nodes

    Platform9

    @Platform9Sys

    Platform9

    Source: eigenmagic.com

    Platform9 initially focussed on OpenStack, but now is shifting focus to Kubernetes. It manages the entire container lifecycle from provisioning and deployment to monitoring and access control.

    Key Features:

    • Requires no maintenance and easily mergers with your infrastructure
    • Provides 24×7 monitoring capabilities to keep the user aware
    • Completely integrated with OpenStack and Kubernetes

    Cost: Contact for pricing (cost based on CPU socket per year; minimum 20 sockets and a 1-year commitment)

    Kismatic

    @Apprenda

    Kismatic

    Acquired by Apprenda last year, Kismatic automates the deployment of Kubernetes clusters in production.

    Key Features:

    • Provides easy and manageable cluster upgrades, and updates
    • Builds on Kubernetes’ strengths by adding advanced features like IAM

    Cost: Contact for pricing

    Google Container Engine

    @googlecloud

    Google Container Engine

    Source: blog.daave.com

    A hosted Kubernetes service from the company that created Kubernetes.

    Key Features:

    • Simple Kubernetes cluster management
    • Reduces time to set up clusters from hours to minutes
    • Control who has access to your Kubernetes clusters with Google accounts

    Cost: 

    • Free for 0-5 nodes
    • 6+ nodes: $0.15 per cluster

    Heptio

    @heptio

    Heptio

    A company started by Kubernetes founders that bridges the gap between cloud-native support and IT.

    Key Features:

    • Fades infrastructure and operation in the background so that you can work more focused
    • Moves operations driven by tickets to operations driven by API
    • Recently announced a Quick Start for Kubernetes on AWS with an aim of getting more AWS users to use Kubernetes

    Cost: Free; paid support options available

    Deis

    @opendeis

    Deis

    Source: npmjs.com

    Recently acquired by Microsoft, this tool provides its users with assistance to start their containerized journey.

    Key Features:

    • Consists of three products – Workflow, Helm, and Steward – which together manage the entire Kubernetes lifecycle
    • Sets up a customized cluster environment on the user’s preferred host
    • Provides support services in getting your team up and running with containers

    Cost: Free

    Registries

     Quay

    @quayio

    Quay

    Source: quay.io

    As you work with Docker, you need a good repository to store and share container images and repositories. Quay from CoreOS assists you with that.

    Key Features:

    • Images marked important stay on top of the home screen
    • Easy conversion of Dockerfile to repository images
    • Built-in security scanning of public container repositories

    Cost:

    • Personal: $12/month (5 private repositories)
    • Skiff: $25/month (10 private repositories)
    • Yacht: $50/month (20 private repositories)
    • Enterprise pricing available, based on # of repos

     JFrog Artifactory

    @jfrog

    JFrog Artifactory

    Source: thenewstack.io

    Artifactory is a repository manager for pretty much any platform you use and is now extending support for Docker containers.

    Key Features: 

    • Provides real-time monitoring for all repositories
    • Upload and manage your repositories from your cloud platform

    Cost:

    • Pro: $2,950/Year
    • Pro Plus: $7,900/Year
    • Pro X: $14,400/Year
    • Enterprise: $29,500/Year (3-license pack)

    Web Server

     Nginx

    @nginx

    Nginx

    Source: monitorix.org

    Nginx is a load balancer and web server that helps keep your app highly available and gives you control over the flow of traffic across your network.

    Key Features:

    • Enables blue-green deployments by switching traffic from one environment to another easily
    • Supports microservices architecture by providing control and monitoring for application services

    Cost: 

    • Nginx OSS: Free
    • Instance 1-4: $2,500 / year and up
    • Volume 5+: Contact for pricing information

    Database Tools

    Elasticsearch

    @elastic

    Elasticsearch

    Source: Elasticsearch

    Elasticsearch is a data storage and analytics tool capable of solving a growing number of use cases. It’s the heart of the Elastic Stack, storing your data centrally for deeper insights and analysis.

    Key Features:

    • Identifies unusual activity in applications functions
    • Can be easily integrated into any existing Docker monitoring system
    • Machine learning (available as an add-on feature as part of the X-Pack subscription offering)

    Cost: Free (Open Source)

     Kibana

    @elastic

    Kibana

    Source: elastic.co/products/kibana

    An open source visualization tool for viewing large scale data with beautiful and powerful charts.

    Key Features:

    • Provides quick and powerful visual representation of data
    • Has a wide variety of charts including histograms, line graphs, and pie charts

    Cost: Free

    Storage

     Flocker

    @ClusterHQ

    Flocker

    Source: clusterhq.com

    Docker containers are ephemeral, which means as you delete a container, its storage is lost. To store data persistently, leverage Flocker, which migrates data as your containers are migrated across your infrastructure.

    Key Features:

    • Easily manage your storage for containers
    • Moves data between databases, and databases between servers
    • Support various storage environments including AWS EBS, Google Persistent Disk, Pure Storage, etc.

    Cost: Free

    Ceph

    @Ceph

    Ceph

    Source: tracker.ceph.com

    A tool that helps store Docker container data persistently.

    Key Features:

    • Rebalances data in cases of data loss
    • Doesn’t require manual intervention to sort and fix data

    Cost: Free

    Networking

    Flannel

    @coreos

    Flannel

    This tool from CoreOS solves the problem you have when creating subnets for your organization by creating an overlay mesh network.

    Key Features:

    • Handles virtual networking for Kubernetes
    • Creates and manages a series of subnets
    • It reduces the complexity that comes with port mapping

    Cost: Free

    Calico

    @projectcalico

    Calico

    Source: calico.gforge.inria.fr

    If you are having a hard time with your SDNs because of them being centrally managed and traditional, this tool simplifies it for you with a distributed networking layer.

    Key Features:

    • Provides a simplified network model design
    • Easily scales from a single laptop to an enterprise deployment
    • Customize and define which connections are allowed and which are not

    Cost: Fre

    Operating Systems

    resinOS

    @resin_io

    resinOS

    Source: dribble.com

    resinOS is a lightweight container operating system built with embedded devices in mind.

    Key Features:

    • Well-suited for IoT applications with many device types and complex networking needs
    • Allows to build your own custom OS

    Cost: Free

    Snappy Ubuntu Core

    @ubuntu

    Snappy Ubuntu Core

    Source: oxynets.wordpress.com

    If you like working on Ubuntu, you’ll like this container-optimized OS that is a minimalist version of Ubuntu for Docker.

    Key Features:

    • A familiar interface that many IT users love and have used for more than a decade
    • Provides a vast list of supported apps
    • Is lightweight as a container OS should be, and is still powerful

    Cost: Free

    Infrastructure & Management

    AWS ECS

    @awscloud

    AWS ECS

    Source: g2crowd.com

    EC2 container service (ECS) relieves you of the stress of scheduling and deploying multiple containers, by doing them itself. If you’ve got infrastructure on AWS already, ECS is your fastest route to containerization.

    Key Features:

    • Based on the leading cloud vendor, AWS, it is highly stable, scalable, and easy to use
    • Monitors clusters and shows the resources used and resources available
    • Easily deploy, upgrade and rollback thousands of containers without lags

    Cost: Pay only for AWS services you create to store and run your application.

     Azure Container Service

    @Azure

    Azure Container Service

    Source: sumologic.com

    Microsoft’s response to Amazon’s ECS, ACS lets you run containers on the Azure cloud platform.

    Key Features:

    • Lets you use Kubernetes, DC/OS, or Swarm for orchestration
    • Merges with your existing management system and tools, and makes it easier to migrate apps from traditional infrastructure

    Cost: Pay only for the VMs and associated storage and networking resources consumed.

    DigitalOcean

    @digitalocean

    DigitalOcean

    Source: digitalocean.com

    An economical alternative to the major cloud providers, DigitalOcean is a reliable cloud platform with support for Docker.

    Key Features:

    • Quickly start deploying Docker, using their built-in apps
    • Network provides high speeds up to 40 Gbps
    • Load balancing service sorts the incoming traffic to provide better user experience

    Cost: Standard droplet pricing starting at $5/month based on memory, SSD, processor, and transfer resources.

    Configuration Management

     Chef

    @chef

    Chef

    Source: getapp.com

    Chef is the leading configuration management tool that is evolving to support container workloads.

    Key features:

    • Automate the creation and configuration of nodes and containers
    • Manage all on-premise and cloud servers

    Cost:

    • Chef Automate: $137/node/annual
    • AWS OpsWorks with Chef Automate: Starts at $0.0155node/hour
    • Hosted Chef: $72node/annual

     Puppet

    @puppetize

    Puppet

    Source: blog.jasonantman.com

    Another popular configuration management tool that

    Key Features:

    • Simplifies operations by treating infrastructure as code
    • Manages the creation of Docker infrastructure
    • Automates every stage of your data center to provide more control

    Cost: $3,000/year for up to 500 nodes

     Ansible

    @ansible

    Ansible

    Source: marketplace.rackspace.com

    Automate your infrastructure and connect different teams together to help your IT teams work faster and more efficiently.

    Key Features:

    • Relieves IT of repetitive work by automating it for them
    • Integrates with Docker to automate common infrastructure tasks
    • 2,400 contributors submit new modules regularly

    Cost: Contact for pricing information

     SaltStack

    @SaltStack

    SaltStack

    Source: hveem.no

    Based on the open source Salt project, SaltStack is an intelligent orchestration and automation tool for infrastructure.

    Key Features:

    • Orchestrates and automates any cloud or non-cloud application
    • Built to manage every angle of the business’ infrastructure and application
    • Provides user with consultations and service support

    Cost: Contact for pricing information

     Terraform

    @HashiCorp

     TerraForm

    Enables you to treat infrastructure as code. Create, upgrade your applications to newer versions and deploy it efficiently and quickly using this tool.

    Key Features:

    • Provides a preview of your execution plan before you press apply
    • Builds infrastructures efficiently and shows the number of dependencies on it
    • Show the change and the order of change after execution to decrease errors

    Cost: Free

     AZK

    @azukiapp

    AZK

    Source: docs.azk.io

    Automate the creation of development environments with this tool. It uses containers instead of VMs and has a small footprint.

    Key Features:

    • The Azkfile.js provides parity between development environments
    • Azkfile.js can be reused completely or partly according to you
    • Executes short and simple recipe files

    Cost: Free

     InSpec

    @chef

    InSpec

    InSpec, from Chef, is an infrastructure testing and compliance testing tool. It works with Chef to not just create new instances, but ensure they are compliant.

    Key Features:

    • Tests the infrastructure and provides results in easy to understand language
    • Enforce your security rules with any application under development
    • Provides remote testing and a local testing agent if needed

    Cost: Free

    CI Tools

     Jenkins

    @jenkinsci

    Jenkins

    Source: turnkeylinux.org

    A leading continuous integration (CI) tool that helps to automate build and test cycles for any application, Jenkins is an essential tool for many DevOps teams.

    Key Features:

    • Provides hundreds of plugins to integrate with other tools across the stack
    • A self-contained Java based program, Jenkins runs right out of the box

    Cost: Free

     CircleCI

    @circleci

    CircleCI

    Source: qxf2.com

    A tool that helps you start integrating as soon as you install it, CircleCI makes your CI process faster and simpler.

    Key Features:

    • Allows immediate building and deploying as soon as you sign up
    • Provides compilers for Java, Scala, CoffeeScript, Less, Haskell and many more
    • Provides support for Nose, Django, Cucumber, RSpec and other test runners

    Cost: First container is free; additional containers $50/month (per container)

     GitLab

    @gitlab

    GitLab

    Source: gitlab.com

    Starting out with Git repository management, GitLab now combines CI, CD and code review together to handle the entire application lifecycle.

    Key Features:

    • Includes an IDE, code review, activity streams, issue tracking and repository management as well
    • Built-in container registry to store and scan Docker repositories

    Cost: 

    • Community Edition: Free, unlimited users
    • Enterprise Edition Starter: $3.25/user/month
    • Enterprise Edition Premium: $16.59/user/month

     Shippable

    @BeShippable

    Shippable

    Source: rpocklin.wordpress.com

    A CI tool that lets you build, test, and deploy applications with easy and speed.

    Key Features:

    • Lets you build Docker images from code repositories
    • Integrates with all popular Docker registries
    • Integrates with powerful orchestration tools like Kubernetes to deploy Docker containers

    Cost: 

    • Free: c4.large node, 1 concurrent job
    • $25/75/150 /month: c4 large/xlarge/2xlarge nodes, each concurrent job
    • Enterprise Support Add-on: Starts at $500/month

    CodeShip

    @codeship

     CodeShip

    Source: elements.heroku.com

    A fully customizable CI tool that features native support for Docker.

    Key Features:

    • Docker support allows you complete control over the environment you create
    • Works across many cloud platforms and orchestration tools
    • Offers dedicated instances to host your code

    Cost: 

    • CodeShip Basic: Free for 100 builds/month, pricing starts at $49/month
    • CodeShip Pro: Starts at $75/month

     CodeFresh

    @codefresh

     CodeFresh

    Source: marketplace.atlassian.com

    CodeFresh is a tool that provides continuous integration and oversees the entire container process from start to end.

    Key Features:

    • Creates a Docker image after every change made to the file
    • Test each build, whether standalone or part of a composition

    Cost: 

    • Open Source: Free (public repos only)
    • Basic: Starts at $99/month (public & private repos)
    • Pro: $299/month, dedicated nodes with SSH

    Container Lifecycle Management

     Cloud66

    @cloud66

    Cloud66

    Source: blog.cloud66.com

    Cloud66 is a container manager that helps you build, deploy and manage Docker containers in production.

    Key Features:

    • Provides various services like image building, repository, load balancing, and more
    • Reduces the need for Chef and Puppet by assisting in configuring containers
    • Easily scale to any server or cloud of your preference

    Cost: $19/project/month

     Weave

    @weaveworks

    Weave

    Source: docs.giantswarm.io

    Weave extends container orchestrators like Kubernetes and Swarm and eases the management of containers in production.

    Key Features:

    • Provides a live map of your applications to help visualize and troubleshoot issues
    • Continuous integration pipelines help convert code into Docker images
    • Provides high-level security and encryption by default

    Cost: 

    • Standard: $30/node/month
    • Enterprise: $150/node/month

    Monitoring Tools

     Retrace

    Retrace

    Retrace is the only developer tool that combines APM, logs, errors, monitoring, and metrics in a fully-integrated, multi-environment suite with powerful monitoring and logging capabilities. Plus, it works out of the box with your existing stack.

    Key Features: 

    • Centralized repository
    • Real-time alerts for new errors
    • Automatic error collection
    • Identify top errors
    • Ignore specific errors
    • Quickly identify spikes in error rates
    • Find the root cause of issues much faster
    • Track application errors without logging them
    • View web request details
    • Identify unique errors
    • View related log messages
    • Analyze errors in several ways

    Cost: 

    • $10/month for QA/Pre-prod Servers
    • $25 to $50/month for Production Servers
    • Try it free for 14 days

     Sumo Logic

    @SumoLogic

    Sumo Logic

    Source: sumologic.com

    A log analysis tool that features advanced analysis, visualization, and alerting options.

    Key Features:

    • Diagnose and troubleshoot your application and infrastructure problems
    • Provides machine learning analytics to predict threats and anomalies before they become an issue and affect users
    • Provides real-time security and operational information

    Cost: 

    • Free: Up to 500MB/day
    • Professional – Logs & Metrics: $90/month, 1GB/day
    • Enterprise – Logs & Metrics: $150/month, 1GB/day

    Datadog

    @datadoghq

    Datadog

    Source: docs.datadoghq.com

    Monitor your applications and infrastructures as they grow, with this modern and easy to understand monitoring tool.

    Key Features:

    • Customize the dashboard according to your preference
    • Provides in-depth monitoring for Docker containers
    • Provides automatic system alert on critical issues

    Cost: 

    • Free: up to 5 hosts
    • Pro: $15/host/month
    • Enterprise: $23/host/month

     Logstash

    @elastic

    Logstash

    Source: elastic.co/products/logstash

    Logstash aggregates, transforms, structures, and pushes logs and other data from a variety of sources and is part of the Elastic Stack.

    Key Features:

    • Accepts data of different formats, and stores and processes them
    • Logstash collects and sorts files according to name size and other labels
    • Provides a variety of outputs to choose as file destinations

    Cost: Free

     Pagerduty

    @pagerduty

    Pagerduty

    Source: Pagerduty.com

    The leading incident management tool, Pagerduty provides a mature routing system for alerts and alarms when things go wrong with you app.

    Key Features:

    • Is an essential tool for Dockerized apps as they are complex, and errors occur at every level
    • Avoids alert fatigue by ensuring the right alert reaches the right person
    • Allows you to set complex routing rules to notify different people and different teams about errors and issues

    Cost: 

    • Lite: $9/month
    • Basic: $29/month
    • Standard: $49/month
    • Enterprise: $99/month

    PaaS

     OpenShift

    @openshift

    OpenShift

    Source: getapp.com

    From Red Hat, OpenShift is a PaaS platform with a focus on Docker and Kubernetes.

    Key Features:

    • Open, edit and manage your applications and containers from your cloud/data center
    • Leverage Kubernetes to orchestrate containers at scale

    Cost: Free Starter package; contact for Pro pricing (coming soon)

     Heroku Docker

    @heroku

    Heroku Docker

    Source: blog.codeship.com

    Heroku is the leading Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) that comes with more than 150 add-ons and more than 3000 ready-to-deploy buttons to increase your production time and decrease the time you take to solve issues.

    Key Features:

    • Provides complete assistance with failovers, patching, upgrading, and system builds
    • Sets up, operates and maintains your work so that you can focus on creating more useful applications
    • Is now evolving to support Docker workflows

    Cost:

    • Free: 1 web, 1 worker
    • Hobby: $7 per dyno/month
    • Standard and Performance Plans: $25 to $500 per dyno/month

     Jelastic

    @Jelastic

    Jelastic

    Source: scalatra.org

    A PaaS platform that does all the heavy lifting so you can focus on building your app.

    Key Features:

    • Lets you host your apps with any cloud vendor and provides cloud portability
    • Enables you to migrate your codebase to the platform without any changes to the code
    • Even supports legacy applications

    Cost: 

    • Public Cloud: Starts at $10/month
    • Private Cloud: $150/server/month, plus $200 – $1,000 one-time setup fee
    • Partnership: Revenue sharing, discounted hardware, and professional services for free

     Flynn

    @FlynnScale

    Flynn

    Source: maxmalm.se

    Based on an open source tool, Flynn is a PaaS platform to create, deploy, and host applications.

    Key Features:

    • Being open source this tool provides many plugins and extensions
    • Integrates with Docker for deployment
    • Automatically scans your application for errors before deploying it

    Cost: $3,499/month billed annually, up to 5 users; $399 each additional user per month

     Tsuru

    @tsurupaas

    Tsuru

    An open source PaaS tool helping you in every step of your application, offering a fast and safe deploy process with a simple Git push, optimizing your resource utilization, rebalancing resources, and recovering failed units and nodes automatically.

    Key Features:

    • Runs applications written in any language easily
    • Lets you deploy Docker images with ease
    • Customize the resource allocation for your application

    Cost: Free

    These are 50 tools that help you work on Docker, but they’re certainly not the only ones. Theses tools play various roles in your process of creating applications, containerizing them, and deploying them in distributed clusters.

     
  • Igor Monteiro 11:20 em 12 12UTC July 12UTC 2018 Link Permanente | Resposta  

    Dockerizing WebSphere Application Server Network Deployment 

    Ingredients

    1. Docker engine (https://docs.docker.com/engine/installation/)

    2. IBM Installation Manager binaries downloaded from Passport Advantage:

    • agent.installer.lnx.gtk.x86_64_1.8.5.zip(CND0ZML)

    3. IBM WebSphere Application Server traditional Version 9 binaries downloaded from Passport Advantage:

    • WAS_ND_V9.0_MP_ML.zip (CND1LML)

    4. IBM SDK Java Technology Edition Version 8 binaries downloaded from Passport Advantage:

    • sdk.repo.8030.java8.hpux.zip (CND18ML)
    • This recipe uses Version 9 binaries for creating images, for creating images with different version download the relevant version binaries and update the Dockerfile
    • For building WAS Version 8.5.5 images use the supplied Dockerfiles with Version 8.5.5 product binaries

    Step-by-step

    1. Clone websphere-traditional GitHub repository

      1. In the browser go to the repository link https://github.com/WASdev/ci.docker.websphere-traditional

      2. Click clone or download button on the right-hand side of the repository and click copy to clipboard button and copy the URL.

      3. Open a terminal in your system and move to the folder where you want to clone the repository.

      4. Type the command `git clone https://github.com/WASdev/ci.docker.websphere-traditional `.

      clone_repo1

      The repository is successfully cloned.

    2. Build IBM WebSphere Application Server Network Deployment prereq image

      IBM WebSphere Application Server Network Deployment images are build using multiple Dockerfile approach. Multiple Dockerfile approach is taken to reduce the image size.

      First, let us build the prereq image, this image installs IBM Installation Manager , IBM WebSphere Application Server Network Deployment Version 9  and IBM WebSphere SDK Java Technology Edition.

      1. Place the downloaded binaries on a remote server. During the build process we will download the image from the remote server and install the products and delete the binaries in a single layer and this helps in reducing the final image size.

      2. Go to the folder where the prereq Dockerfile is available by executing `cd ci.docker.websphere-traditional/network-deployment/install/`

      3. To build the nd prereq image,execute the command `docker build –build-arg URL=ftp://<user>:<password>@<remote hostname/ip>/<folder where the binaries are placed on the remote machine> -t ndv9tar -f Dockerfile.v9.prereq .`

      ndv9_image

      Prereq docker image has been successfully built.

      4. To review the image,execute the command ` docker images ndv9tar `

      ndv9_im

    3. Run a container using the prereq image to create WebSphere Application Server installation tar file

      1. Run a container using the prereq image to get the installation tar by executing the command ` docker run –rm -v $(pwd):/tmp ndv9tar `

      ndv9_tar1.

      .

      ndv9_tar2

      was.tar file is successfully created and placed in the install folder.

      2. To confirm the creation of tar file ,execute the command `ls`

      ndv9_dir

      We will use this tar file and build the install image.

    4. Build IBM WebSphere Application Server Network Deployment install image using the tar file

      1. To build the nd install image, execute the command ` docker build -t nd -f Dockerfile.install . `

      ndv9_install

      Network Deployment image `nd` has been successfully built

      2. To review the image, execute the command  ` docker images nd `

      ndv9_nd

      We are going to use this image as the base image and build deployment manager , custom node and appserver images.

    5. Build deployment manager docker image from nd image

      1. To build the deployment manager image , go to the folder where the Dockerfile is available by executing , cd ../dmgr

      2. List the contents of the folder by executing, ls

      dmgr_ls_1

      3. To build the deployment manager image , execute the command `docker build -t dmgr  . `

      dmgr_i

      Deployment Manager `dmgr` has been successfully built.

      4. To review the image, execute the command `docker images dmgr`

      dmgr_image_1

    6. Build Custom node image from nd image

      1. To build the custom node image , go to the folder where the Dockerfile is available by executing `cd ../custom`

      2. List the contents of the folder by executing  `ls`

      custom_ls

      3. To build the custom node image ,execute the command `docker build -t custom .`

      custom_image

      Custom node image `custom` has been successfully built.

    7. Build Application server image from nd image

      1. To build the application server image, go to the folder where the Dockerfile is available by executing ` cd ../appserver `

      2. List the contents of the folder by executing,`ls`

      appserver_ls_1

      3. To build the application server image , execute the command `docker build -t appserver .`

      appserver_image

      Application Server image `appserver` has been successfully built.

    8. Create docker network

      1. To create a new docker bridge network , execute the command ` docker network create cell-network `

      network1

      2. To confirm the network creation, execute the command ` docker network ls `

      network_ls

    9. Run deployment manager container

      1. To start a deployment manager container , execute the command `docker run –name dmgr -h dmgr –net=cell-network -p 9060:9060 -d dmgr`

      dmgr_image

      2. To review the logs and ensure deployment manager process is started , execute the command ` docker logs -f –tail=all dmgr `

      dmgr_logs

      3. To check the status of container, execute the command ` docker ps -a `

      dmgr_ps

      The deployment manager container `dmgr` is running successfully.

    10. Run custom node container

      1. To start the custom node container , execute the command `docker run –name custom1 -h custom1 –net=cell-network -e PROFILE_NAME=Custom01 -e NODE_NAME=CustomNode01 -e DMGR_HOST=dmgr -e DMGR_PORT=8879 -d custom`

      custom_c

      2. To review the logs and ensure custom node is federated to deployment manager and node agent process is started , execute the command ` docker logs -f –tail=all custom1 `

      custom_c_1

      custom_c_2

      custom_c_3

      3. To check the status of container,execute the command ` docker ps -a `

      custom_ps

      Multiple custom node containers can be started one by one by providing different node names.

      *Do not try to start all the custom node containers parallely , as the custom node in the image is created with node name CustomNode and that is modified after the node is federated to deployment manager and the node with same name cannot be federated to deployment manager.

    11. Run application server container

      1. To start the Application Server container, execute the command `docker run –name server1 -h server1 –net=cell-network -e PROFILE_NAME=AppSrv01 -e NODE_NAME=ServerNode01 -e DMGR_HOST=dmgr -e DMGR_PORT=8879 -d appserver`

      appserver_c

      2. To review the logs and ensure application server node is federated to deployment manager and node agent and server process are started , execute the command ` docker logs -f –tail=all server1 `

      appserver_c_1

      appserver_c_2

      appserver_c_3

      3. To check the status of container,execute the command ` docker ps -a `

      appserver_ps

      Multiple application server containers can be started one by one by providing different node names.

      *Do not try to start all the appserve  containers parallely , as the node in the image is created with node name ServerNode and that is modified after the node is federated to deployment manager and the node with same name cannot be federated to deployment manager.

    12. Access the admin console

      Now we have successfully created a Network Deployment Cell Topology using docker containers, let us review the configuration in admin console

      1. In the browser go to the link http://localhost:9060/ibm/console/login.do

      admin_login

      2. Click System Administration -> Nodes

      ndv9_adm

      You have successfully built IBM WebSphere Application Server Network Deployment images and configured a Cell topology with Deployment Manager , Custom node and Application Server.

     
  • Igor Monteiro 11:20 em 12 12UTC July 12UTC 2018 Link Permanente | Resposta  

    So you want Dockerize …DB2? So did I 

    IBM® Db2® is a multi-workload database designed to help you quickly develop, test and build applications for your business. Designed for operational and analytic workloads. IBM® Db2® Developer-C edition is a full feature, free version for non-production environments. Ideal for developers.

    Summary

    Install and run Db2 Developer-C Edition v11.1.3.3 using Docker and containers running CentOS. The image tag is now 11.1.3.3a.

    Highlights

    • Latest: Db2 v11.1 Mod Pack 3 Fix Pack 3 iFix001
    • Db2 HADR Support
    • Multi-platform support- x86_64, ppc64le, s390x

    Prerequisites

    • Docker engine
    • Directory/filesystem for persistent storage (<db storage dir>)

    Getting Db2 Developer-C image

    1. Login into repository:
       docker login 
       User: <docker id>
       Password: <docker password>
      
    2. Pull the db2server image:
      For 11.1.3.3, we support 3 different architectures. Their respective docker pull commands are:
      docker pull store/ibmcorp/db2_developer_c:11.1.3.3a-x86_64
      docker pull store/ibmcorp/db2_developer_c:11.1.3.3a-ppc64le
      docker pull store/ibmcorp/db2_developer_c:11.1.3.3a-s390x

      • Previous version tags: 11.1.3.3x, 11.1.3.3 and 11.1.2.2b

    Setting up and running containers

    1. Below is an example configuration. Save it to an .env_list and edit it if you wish.

      LICENSE=accept
      DB2INSTANCE=db2inst1
      DB2INST1_PASSWORD=password
      DBNAME=testdb
      BLU=false
      ENABLE_ORACLE_COMPATIBILITY=false
      UPDATEAVAIL=NO
      TO_CREATE_SAMPLEDB=false
      REPODB=false
      IS_OSXFS=false
      PERSISTENT_HOME=true
      HADR_ENABLED=false
      ETCD_ENDPOINT=
      ETCD_USERNAME=
      ETCD_PASSWORD=

      • LICENSE is to agree to the terms and conditions of the Db2 software contained in this image
      • DB2INSTANCE is to specify the Db2 Instance name
      • DB2INST1_PASSWORD is to specify the respective Db2 Instance Password
      • DBNAME creates an initial database with the name provided or leave empty if no database is needed
      • BLU can be set to true to enable BLU Acceleration for instance
      • ENABLE_ORACLE_COMPATIBILITY can be set to true to enable Oracle Compatibility on the instance
      • UPDATEAVAIL can be set to yes if there is an existing instance and running a new container with a higher Db2 level. Will be deprecated on next release
      • TO_CREATE_SAMPLEDB can be set to true to create a sample (pre-populated) database
      • REPODB can be set to true to create a Data Server Manager repository database
      • set IS_OSXFS=true if you are running on macOS
      • PERSISTENT_HOME is true by default, only specify to false if you are running Docker for Windows
      • HADR_ENABLED if set to true, Db2 HADR will be configured. The following three env variables depend on HADR_ENABLED to be true
      • ETCD_ENDPOINT is for specifying your own provided ETCD key-value store. Enter your endpoints with a comma as the delimiter and without a space. This env variable is needed if HADR_ENABLED is set to true
      • ETCD_USERNAME specify the username credential for ETCD. If empty, it will use your Db2 instance
      • ETCD_PASSWORD specify the password credential for ETCD. If empty, it will use your Db2 instance password
    2. docker run -h db2server_<your_container_name> \
              --name db2server --restart=always \  
              --detach \  
              --privileged=true \
              -p 50000:50000 -p 55000:55000 \
              --env-file .env_list \ 
              -v <db storage dir>:/database \
              <image name> 
      
      • where <db storage dir> is an existing local directory and .env_list is a collection of environment variables.
    3. After the docker run command is executed, a duration will be required until completion. User may run docker logs -f <your_container_name> to tail the docker entry point script. To confirm Db2 container is ready, in the logs we will see the message Setup has completed.
    4. Log on to the container:
       docker exec -ti db2server_<your_container_name> bash -c "su - ${DB2INSTANCE}"
      
      • where ${DB2INSTANCE} is the name of the instance user used during docker run.

    Running Db2 HADR

    Requirements:

    • Two Db2 Developer-C Edition containers running preferably on different servers. One will automatically configured to be the primary, and the other will be the standby. The takeovers will happen accordingly.
    • An additional shared volume mount -v <hadr storage dir>:/hadr between the two Db2 Docker deployments. An NFS server could be used as an example.
    • Include –ipc=host, –net=host in the docker run command and of course the HADR environment variables mentioned above.
    • Most importantly: You must have your own ETCD distributed key-value store which will be the two Db2 containers source of truth in the event one container goes down. Our governor that resides in both Db2 Docker containers must be able to communicate with the ETCD endpoints provided.

    An example docker run command to include HADR:
    docker run --name db2server --restart=always --privileged --ipc=host -p 50000 -p 55000 --env-file .env_list -v /home/db2server_fs/database:/database -v /home/db2server_fs/shared:/hadr -e HADR_ENABLED=true --net=host store/ibmcorp/db2_developer_c:11.1.3.3x-x86_64

    In the event we lose one of the containers, the user must manually start back up the container so the two Db2 containers can HADR connect once again.

    Share your try below!

     
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